Peru Travel Photos | Travel Tuesdays

I spent 6 weeks traveling through Peru making travel photos, soaking up the sun on beautiful beaches, wandering through colonial cities, exploring tiny villages on the countryside and hiking through the Andes celebrating the last days of my 20’s. However, there was an incident with a man wielding a gun which still haunts me and gives me a lot of apprehension about other South American countries.

I do not take government warnings lightly but if I was scared off by every place that has a warning I would’ve probably never left New Jersey. For me, my positive experiences far outweigh my negative ones and I will still travel.

 

Peru travel photos of a Girl on Tequille Island on Lake Titicaca in Peru. Kira Vos (Horvath)Machu Picchu Peru travel photographer. Kira Vos (Horvath)Huarez Peru woman begging Peru travel photos. Kira Vos (HorvathCusco Peru travel photos by photographer Kira Vos (Horvath). Peru travel photos at the Floating towns in Lake Titicaca Peru. Kira Vos (Horvath)Hiking the Andes near Huarez Peru travel photo. Kira Vos (Horvath)Man carrying a large load of wheat in Tequila Island by travel Photographer Kira Vos (Horvath). Peru travel photos by Travel photographer Kira Vos (Horvath) in Peru.Bored girl in Lima Peru travel photo. Kira Vos (Horvath)Men sewing or weaving on Tequille Island on Lake Titicaca in Peru. Kira Vos (Horvath)Peru travel photos in Cusco Peru by travel Photographer Kira Vos (Horvath).Travel photographer in Peru. Kira Vos (Horvath)Peru travel photos of the Ica sand dunes in Peru travel photographer Kira Vos (Horvath).Mancora Peru travel photographer. Kira Vos (Horvath)Peru travel photos in Cusco woman selling flowers by Travel Photographer Kira Vos (Horvath) in Peru.

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La Carpio | Nonprofit Photography from Costa Rica | Travel Tuesdays

[tribulant_slideshow gallery_id=”20″]

LA CARPIO

SAN JOSE, COSTA RICA-

La Carpio is a 9 mile square piece of land wedged between landfills and sewage runoffs located on the outskirts of Costa Rica’s capital city, San Jose. Nearly 20 years ago Nicaraguan refugees trying to escape a civil war, corrupt government and extreme poverty began a settlement there out of scraps of corrugated tin and whatever else they could find. The shanty town grew rapidly as the Nicaraguan immigrants found more opportunities for work and took advantage of the Costa Rican treaty which grants all people living in the country free health care and education. Currently there are over 34,000 people living in La Carpio and despite better opportunities, poverty and crime are rampant.

In 1997 the Costa Rican Humanitarian Foundation, led by the resilient Gail Nystrom, infiltrated the community setting up schools, clinics, daycares, planting gardens, painting murals, sponsoring soccer players, building better sidewalks, donating food, clothing and many, many other programs. One of the most important features Nystrom’s work is trying to make La Carpio a model to reverse the poverty cycle.

Nystrom first came to Costa Rica in 1978 with the Peace Corps and never left. Although she spearheads projects throughout Costa Rica it is La Carpio where her heart resides. Between her phone which rings incessantly, to her mind which can bounce between multiple conversations in a single breath, her energy seems limitless. As she drives around in her beat-up old van locals call out her nickname “Giselle” (which is easier for them to pronounce than Gail) like a well-loved local hero. She laughs and jokes with “the boys” the local gangs, who eye my camera menacingly, and is a sign of hope to the mother with three hungry babies and no food in their house. From dawn till dusk Nystrom is on the move visiting with the children and teachers at the daycares, fielding emails from donors, working with numerous volunteers and simply being present in a community otherwise ignored.

Nystrom has faith in the durability of her projects, saying they are “sustainable in spirit, sustainable in infrastructure, sustainable in the services they give to people,” and that the women and men of La Carpio she has helped develop the program will keep things going. She works tirelessly to instill a sense of pride and self-worth in the community because she believes in order for La Carpio to thrive and succeed the people in the community need to care. Her methods are working. Despite lingering drug and gang violence things have improved vastly. Many people have concrete walled homes, are getting proper educations and are able to leave the barrio, and simply seeing the brightly colored buildings and smiles on the children’s faces reflect an overall better spirit throughout the community.

If you would like to donate to the efforts being made in La Carpio: http://www.crhf.org

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Mentawai Islands Sumatra Indonesia | Travel Tuesdays

One of the craziest experiences I have ever had was in 2007 when I was backpacking through Indonesia and set my sights on spending some time with the indigenous people of the Mentawai Islands off the coast of Sumatra. It’s pretty funny when you  travel and are completely unprepared for an experience like this but how everything ends up working out in the end.

I showed up to this extremely remote island with very little money, no mosquito net in this malaria rampant land and with pretty much no idea how I was going to make this happen. But despite my rather ill-prepared ways I managed to find a local medicine man who agreed to take me to his home deep in the jungle.

Everything about this trip was crazy. The 3 hour wobbly canoe ride, trekking through the densest jungle imaginable in shin deep mud, and living off of tree shavings and exotic fruits for three days. However, it was so worth it. Spending time with people living like they did hundreds of years ago was spectacular. They are a people who tattoo their bodies from head to toe and live in tiny huts on stilts hours away from another person. They are a beautiful tribe determined to keep their traditions despite the Sumatra governments attempts at trying to “civilize” them. Here are some of my favorites from those few days in the jungle.

Indigenous people of the Mentawai Island Sumatra Indonesia travel photography. Kira Vos (Horvath) PhotographyMentawai Islands Sumatra Indonesia travel photography. Kira Vos (Horvath) PhotographyIndigenous people of the Mentawai Island Sumatra Indonesia travel photography. Kira Vos (Horvath)Indigenous people of the Mentawai Island Sumatra Indonesia travel photography. Kira Vos (Horvath)Mentawai Islands Sumatra Indonesia travel photography. Kira Vos (Horvath)Mentawai Islands Sumatra indigenous people of Indonesia travel photography. Kira Vos (Horvath)

 

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  • Saandor

    Travel Tuesdays are my favorite!!!ReplyCancel

New England Fisherman | Travel Tuesdays

I don’t remember a whole lot about the creation of this photo or the New England fisherman in it but I do remember making it one day while out feature hunting for The Salem News. I really love the “feel” to this photo, the moody, cold light and interesting framing of the man fishing down by the harbor in Beverly, MA.

So many times while working there I would be asked to go out and simply find art. Wander around our coverage area looking for someone or something of interest. It was often hard on cold, gloomy days like this but featuring hunting always made me push myself to be more inventive, more creative and simply more resourceful.

The water was always a hot spot and I could almost always find someone doing something down on the coast. I would also flip through the yellow pages and make a list of interesting businesses I could drop by on. I had a whole arsenal of backup locations including beekeeper, dog washer and palm reader.

New England Fisherman fishing by the Beverly, MA harbor on a cold day by travel photographer Kira Vos (Horvath).

 

 

 

 

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  • Sandor

    I certainly do look forward to your Travel Tuesdays!ReplyCancel

Sad Girl from Sapa Vietnam | Travel Tuesdays

I stumbled upon this sad little face while hiking through the rice patties in Sapa, Vietnam. Her dirty, tear-smeared face and the wonderful, challenging look she gave me in the late golden sunshine was simply priceless. I’m not sure why she was so sad, her parents were near by working the fields, but I reached into my bag and found a packet of crumbled up cookies which she quickly snatched from my hands and ran off. It’s sometimes really cool communicating without ever saying a word.

Photo at sunset of sad girl from Hmong tribe in Sapa Vietnam by travel photographer Kira Vos (Horvath).

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  • Sandor

    One of my favorite face photos that you have captured!! Maybe #1 ?ReplyCancel